[Image is a graphic divided with text on the left and three photos on the right. On the left are three yellow flowers behind text. Text "Carrier of the Month" is in light teal above text "Doll Carriers" in large bold teal. The hashtag BWTCCOTM is in black underneath the teal text. Underneath the text is a logo of a baby loon sitting on a larger loon's back with black hand lettering to the right "Babywearing Twin Cities." Right side of the graphic are three images in a column. Top image of a grinning East Asian/white boy with his hands up in the air. A silk scarf is used as a doll sling to hold up a weighted doll around his torso. The doll is not positioned properly. Middle image is of the back of a toddler who is wearing a baby doll in a red and ecru bubble-patterned buckle soft-structured doll carrier. Bottom image is of a white brunette toddler in Christmas jammies wearing a purple strapped buckle carrier with a doll on her back.]

Children copy the behavior of those around them. It’s one way that they learn. When wearing is part of their lives, it becomes part of their play as well. There are many carrier companies that make doll carriers in the form of buckle carriers, meh dais/bei dais, ring slings, etc. If you are particularly drawn to a specific carrier, some companies make ones for children that look just like the bigger (weight-bearing) carriers!

Image of a toddler sitting on the ground with a blue buckle onbuhimo laid out and two dolls inside. Next to the carrier is a blue and white ikat scarf.

Another option is to use adult-sized scarves as doll wraps. Keep in mind that doll slings are not meant to be weight-bearing.

Image of the profile of a brunette female toddler wearing pink and white dinosaur pajamas. She has a black haired doll on her front in a multi colored Dollar Tree scarf worn in a ring sling type shape. She is looking away from the camera with her hand in her mouth

Image from the back of a tan skin light brown haired child wearing a doll on her back in a multi-colored striped piece of fabric that is being used as a doll wrap carrier. Doll is a little askew on child's back. Child has a thumbs up. In the background is a bookshelf full of books.

Some times older siblings get jealous of younger siblings “taking their spot.” Some times these situations happen even after months of not-wearing. Offering a carrier those children can use to wear their beloved dolls and stuffed animals in can give them a sense of importance and responsibility too. They get some hugs in, in a different but still meaningful way. Doll carriers can make great gifts year round. They’re also a great gift to remind an older sibling that this is an important time for them too at celebrations for their coming sibling.

a tan girl with curly brown hair wearing pink pajamas smiling. She has a brown baby on her back. In the background is a blurry brown curly haired tan baby laying on the floor.

Our Babywearing Twin Cities lending library now has a “Little Wearers Library.” Little Wearers carriers are for any child who ever wanted to imitate their caregiver, or just to keep their baby doll (or horse or block of cheese) close while keeping their hands free for playing or eating a cookie. They fit children from tiny toddlers to elementary age. Any members child is able to check one out, just like any other carrier, and in addition to the regular two carriers per member. Currently the Little Wearers library has ten soft structures buckle carriers and a stretchy wrap, with ring slings, pouch slings, meh dais, and possibly onbuhimos coming.

[Image of a smiling volunteer who is wearing a toddler on her back in a bright rainbow striped woven wrap. The toddler is wearing a baby doll on her back too which is wrapped inside the woven wrap.]

Additional Resources

“Doll Sling Tutorial” by Sleeping Baby Productions

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If you have any questions about babywearing, we encourage you to contact us and/or come learn in person at one of our meetings! Check out our Instagram@BabywearingTwinCities and our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/Babywearingtwincities/).

Images have image descriptions in the alternative text accessible to those who use screen readers.

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