There are several different front carries that can be done with newborns and toddlers. If a longer woven wrap is used for a carry that can be done in a shorter length, there will be length leftover and it’s preference as to whether you like the extra length or prefer less length at the end. The carries featured below are not an exhaustive list of all that can be done as front (or hip). The carries are in alphabetical order and give a recommended woven wrap length (relative to base length) to use. Unsure of what your base length is? Check out our blog post on front wrap cross carry (FWCC). FWCC is typically used to determine one’s base length with the double knot tied on one’s back. The woven wrap lengths for the carry are just general recommendations. Keep in mind that one’s base length may change over time and isn’t a set number either. Use what works best for you and your wearee(s)!

Front Wrap Carries Featured:

  • Front Cross Carry
  • Front Wrap Cross Carry (and variations)
  • Kangaroo Carry
  • Pocket Wrap Cross Carry
  • Poppin’s Hip Carry
  • Robin’s Hip Carry
  • Traditional Sling Carry

 

Front Cross Carry

This carry can be pre-tied to “pop” baby in and out of as needed. It goes over both shoulders of the caregiver and has two passes over the baby.

3 image collage of a smiling red-haired white woman wearing a demonstration doll on her chest in a red and orange striped woven wrap. Images show front, back and side views of the carry. White text over navy square background: "Length: Base. Front Cross Carry." Logo at bottom of graphic of a small loon on the back of a larger loon above hand-lettered text Babywearing Twin Cities.

 

[3 minute 40 second no voice-audio video demonstrating a front cross carry, with captioned instructions]

[6 minute 49 seconds voice audio with closed captioning demonstrating a front cross carry with a newborn with a folded variation and a non-folded variation]

Front Wrap Cross Carry

There are many variations for this carry aside from double knotting in the back (typically used to determine base length). We have a blog post dedicated to all those variations at https://babywearingtwincities.org/blog/bwitccotm-front-wrap-cross-carry/. A few variations are demonstrated in the videos below.

3 image collage of a smiling white woman with long brown hair wearing a demonstration doll on her chest in a brown striped woven wrap. Images show front, back and side views of the carry. White text over teal square background: "Length: Base (or shorter depending on variation). Front Wrap Cross Carry." Logo at bottom of graphic of a small loon on the back of a larger loon above hand-lettered text Babywearing Twin Cities.

 

[2 minute 20 second video without voice audio of a front wrap cross carry demonstration]

 

[3 minute 26 seconds voice-audio video demonstrating a front wrap cross carry tied at shoulder, with closed captioning option]

[4 minute 45 seconds voice audio with closed captioning, demonstrating a front wrap cross carry with two babies.]

 

[2 minute 49 seconds no voice-audio video demonstrating a front wrap cross carry under bum, with captioned instructions]

 

Kangaroo Carry

Kangaroo carry tied under bum uses up less length. With a longer wrap, the reinforced kangaroo carry tied in back can be another variation. Some prefer to do a pre-tied version too!

3 image collage of a smiling white woman with pulled back dark brown hair wearing a demonstration doll on her chest in a purple and orange woven wrap. Images show front, back and side views of the carry. White text over light teal square background: "Length: Base (or shorter if tied under bum in front). Kangaroo Carry." Logo at bottom of graphic of a small loon on the back of a larger loon above hand-lettered text Babywearing Twin Cities.

[4 minute 20 second no voice-audio video, demonstrating a kangaroo carry, with captioned instructions]

[4 minute 5 second video with voice audio and closed captioning, demonstrating a pre-tied kangaroo carry]

[4 minute 13 second video with voice audio and closed captioning, demonstrating a reinforced kangaroo carry with a newborn]

 

Pocket Wrap Cross Carry

This carry is often taught with stretchy wraps but can be done with woven wraps as well. It’s often tied in back but if preferred, there’s a variation for tying at the shoulder instead.

3 image collage of a smiling red-haired white woman wearing a demonstration doll on her chest in an olive green stretchy wrap. Images show front, back and side views of the carry. White text over navy square background: "Length: Base/Base+1/Stretchy Wrap. Pocket Wrap Cross Carry." Logo at bottom of graphic of a small loon on the back of a larger loon above hand-lettered text Babywearing Twin Cities.

[3 minute 10 second no voice-audio video demonstrating a pocket wrap cross carry using a stretchy wrap, with captioned instructions]

[3 minute 26 second no voice-audio video demonstrating a pocket wrap cross carry tied at shoulder with a woven wrap, with captioned instructions]

 

[4 minute 25 second no voice-audio video demonstrating a tandem pocket wrap cross carry using a stretchy wrap, with captioned instructions]

Poppin’s Hip Carry

As a one-shouldered carry, it may feel like a cooler option for some and has two passes over baby. This carry can be done a pre-tied if desired. Though referred to as a hip carry, this carry can be done with baby more centered on caregiver’s chest. If you’re wearing a baby (or toddler or older child) who’s taller (or just wants to look around more) and will end up in your face, wearing them more onto your hip may be preferred.

3 image collage of a smiling white woman with pulled back dark brown hair wearing a toddler on her chest in a green woven wrap. Images show front, back and side views of the carry. White text over teal square background: "Length: Base Minus 2 or 3. Poppin's Hip Carry." Logo at bottom of graphic of a small loon on the back of a larger loon above hand-lettered text Babywearing Twin Cities.

[2 minute 56 second no voice-audio video demonstrating a pre-tied poppin’s hip carry, with captioned instructions]

[44 second time-lapse no audio video demonstrating a poppin’s hip carry, no captions]

 

Robin’s Hip Carry

This carry is one-shouldered and has one pass over baby instead of two (compared to Poppin’s which often get mixed up in name with Robin’s). If using a shorter wrap, can tie off in front under baby’s bum instead of tying in back. Though referred to as a hip carry, this carry can be done with baby more centered on caregiver’s chest. If you’re wearing a baby (or toddler or older child) who’s taller (or just wants to look around more) and will end up in your face, wearing them more onto your hip may be preferred.

3 image collage of a smiling red-haired white woman wearing a demonstration doll on her chest in a rainbow striped woven wrap. Images show front, back and side views of the carry. White text over navy square background: "Length: Base (or shorter if tying under bum in front. Robin's Hip Carry." Logo at bottom of graphic of a small loon on the back of a larger loon above hand-lettered text Babywearing Twin Cities.

Link to a photo tutorial: https://wrappingrachel.com/2016/03/11/robins-hip-carry-photo-tutorial/

[3 minute 40 seconds no voice-audio video demonstrating a robin’s hip carry, with captioned instructions]

 

Traditional Sling Carry

This carry may be done with less or more in length depending on how much fabric you prefer to have leftover after tying off (or what carrier length is available). It’s one-shouldered, one layered, and is tied at the shoulder with a double knot or a slip knot (lark’s head knot). It is often pre-tied and can be convenient for taking a baby in and out as well as be a cooler option than some other carries since it’s only one layer over baby (versus two or three).

3 image collage of a smiling white woman with long brown hair wearing a demonstration doll on her chest in a green striped woven wrap. Images show front, back and side views of the carry. White text over navy blue square background: "Length: Base Minus 4. Front Wrap Cross Carry." Logo at bottom of graphic of a small loon on the back of a larger loon above hand-lettered text Babywearing Twin Cities.

Link to a photo tutorial: https://brittbrownmarsh.com/2015/10/03/traditionalslingtutorial/

Link to a photo tutorial plus tips and videos: https://tandemtrouble.com/2016/06/09/slipknot-finish-a-photo-tutorial/

 

[5 minute 43 second voice-audio video demonstrating a traditional sling carry with a newborn, closed captioning option]

 

 

 

For forward/front facing out (FFO) options with a woven wrap, check out our blog post at https://babywearingtwincities.org/blog/bwitccotm-front-forward-facing-out-ffo/.

 

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If you have any questions about babywearing, we encourage you to contact us and/or come learn in person at one of our meetings! Check out our Instagram @BabywearingTwinCities and our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/Babywearingtwincities/).

Images have image descriptions in the alternative text accessible to those who use screen readers.

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