Every month we feature a carry or carrier to highlight at our monthly meetings and online (“BWITCCOTM” stands for Babywearing International of the Twin Cities Carry or Carrier of the Month).

This month we are featuring the “rucksack back carry,” also known simply as “the ruck.”

<em>[Image of six women of differing body types and race, with their back toward the viewer. They are wearing children of different ages (and one is a demonstration doll) on their backs in colorful woven wrap baby carriers in a carry known as the rucksack back carry. They are in a meeting room. In white text in the lower left corner is says June 2017 hashtag BWITCCOTM Rucksack Back Carry. The Babywearing International of the Twin Cities logo in white is in the bottom right corner. Along the top and bottom is a purple polka dot border.]
[Image of six women of differing body types and race, with their back toward the viewer. They are wearing children of different ages (and one is a demonstration doll) on their backs in colorful woven wrap baby carriers in a carry known as the rucksack back carry. They are in a meeting room. In white text in the lower left corner is says June 2017 hashtag BWITCCOTM Rucksack Back Carry. The Babywearing International of the Twin Cities logo in white is in the bottom right corner. Along the top and bottom is a purple polka dot border.]

Ready to Rock a Ruck?

The ruck is a one layer back carry that can be comfortable for newborns (for experienced babywearers) to six-month-olds to toddlers and preschoolers! This carry can be done in a variety of woven wrap lengths depending the finish you choose and the variation of the ruck. If this is your first time doing a back carry, or even this particular carry, have a spotter if possible and/or practice over a soft surface such as a bed or a couch, or even kneeling on a carpeted floor. Another option is to practice with a doll or stuffed animal until you feel comfortable with a carry. Or, if you are able, we would love to see you at a local Babywearing International meeting where there are a Volunteer Babywearing Educators ready and happy to assist! If you are a beginner with woven wraps, we recommend that your child be approximately six months old, with good neck control/head support, and able to sit before attempting any back carry. Stretchy wraps (such as those by Boba, Moby, and DIY knit wraps, etc) should NOT be used for back carries.

[Image of a wide-eyed baby on a caregiver's back in a sunshine yellow woven wrap. The caregiver is bent over holding on to the to ends of the wrap while a Volunteer Babywearing Educator spots her.]
[Image of a wide-eyed baby  in a rainbow-striped outfit on a caregiver’s back in a sunshine yellow woven wrap. The caregiver is bent over holding on to the to ends of the wrap while a Volunteer Babywearing Educator spots her.]

Five Tips by our “Ruck Star” Volunteer Babywearing Educators (VBEs):

  • Pin that top rail/hem/edge really snug!
  • Hand the passes from one hand to the other behind the back helps to get them high enough over the wearee’s legs (especially with smaller babies).
  • Don’t be afraid of straightening up after you have a good seat in place. Gravity will help baby’s weight settle deeply in the seat, and make it harder for them to pop it later.
  • Not the best seat? Tied off all ready? There’s still hope. You can still fix that seat. In fact, most ruck variations can be tweaked at the end without re-doing the whole carry!
  • If at first you don’t succeed (and you aren’t sweating buckets), try and try again (when all involved parties are in a good mood again and preferably not hangry). Also, if you’re having a hard time with a squirmy baby, note that some people find the ruck harder with an infant and easier with a bigger/older child.

 

[Image of the backs of a caregiver slightly bent over with a baby on her back and a green woven wrap. A volunteer wearing a purple shirt that features a woman wearing a baby in a carrier with the text "Some Heroes Wear Their Sidekicks," has one hand on the baby's back and another hand on her hip. If there was bubble text in the air it would say, "you totally got this."]
[Image of the backs of a caregiver slightly bent over with a baby on her back and a green woven wrap. A volunteer wearing a purple shirt that features a woman wearing a baby in a carrier with the text “Some Heroes Wear Their Sidekicks,” has one hand on the baby’s back and another hand on her hip. If there was bubble text in the air it would say, “you totally got this.”]

Video Tutorials for a Rucksack Back Carry and its Variations:

Link to a “Seatless Rucksack Back Carry Base-3” captioned video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yyGkPDZ5no4

 

Link to a “Ruck Back Carry” no audio video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLE19hVeDoI

Link to a “Rucksack Carry Three Finishes, Tied in Front, Tibetan, Date Night Finish” captioned video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6z3MQwNoJc

Link to “Rear Reinforced Rucksack Carry (RRR, AKA Pirate Carry) Base-2” captioned video: https://youtu.be/pBPsQHy1ZDM

 

 

Like what you see? Check out hashtag #BWITCCOTM on our Instagram @bwitc (https://www.instagram.com/bwitc) and our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/BWItwincities/).

Have questions about babywearing? Contact us (through our website or Facebook) or, come learn in person at one of our meetings! Wear on!

 

All images have image descriptions in the alternative text visible to screen readers.

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